Norway agree equal pay deal for male and female players

Mon, Oct 09 2017

Credit: Extratime

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A new agreement between Norway’s FA and the country’s international players will see both their male and female international players receive the same financial compensation when they represent their country.

 

The deal, which player’s union boss Joachim Walltin believes to be the first of its kind, will see the male players make a financial contribution to the women’s team.

 

The Norwegian FA will now almost double the remuneration pot for their female players from 3.1 million Norwegian kroner (€330,000) to 6 million kroner (€639,000).

 

This includes the contribution from the country’s male players of 550,000 kroner (€58,500), coming from money that they currently receive for commercial activities undertaken as part of the national teams.

 

There are still some details of the deal to be ironed out but it is expected that the female players will receive a monthly sum depending on the number of national team squads they take part in, compared to their male counterparts who would receive their money annually.

 

“Norway is a country where equal standing is very important for us, so I think it is good for the country and for the sport,” said Joachim Walltin.

 

“For the girls, it will certainly make a difference. Some of them are actually working and studying, as well as playing football, and it’s hard to improve then,” Walltin said.

 

The player’s union boss continued by saying that the improved financial conditions were just one aspect of the deal that appealed to the female players.

 

“The feeling of being really respected is very important for them. The federation can see it as an investment to increase the level of the women’s team,” he said.

 

The deal comes at a time when Norway’s Scandinavian neighbours Denmark recently had to cancel a home women’s friendly against the Netherlands due to a dispute over money.

 

“In Denmark they are still negotiating and in the US things have improved, but we might be the only country where they are treated equally,” Walltin said.

 

The Norwegian deal has been welcomed by a members of the women’s national team including Wolfsburg winger Caroline Graham Hansen, who thanked her male colleagues on Instagram.  

             

“This was maybe a small thing for you to do for us. This will maybe not show in your monthly wages. This was maybe an obvious move for you to do! This though means everything for us! For our team! For our sport!” Hansen said.

 

“But not at least for all the female athletes out there, who does the same work, same sport as men's do, but get paid less! For you to say that equal pay is how it should be, makes me wanna cry!”

 

“Thank you for making this step for female athletes. For showing equality and for helping us all, making it a bit easier, to chase our dreams. To make them come true!” she said.